Woodland Piles – Nature’s Habitats

Woodland Piles – Nature’s Habitats

A Home for the Smaller of Us

Here at Belmont we value our environment and the wildlife it supports, so we do everything we can to ensure the health of our woodland and pasture. One of the ways we do this is by creating these habitat piles at the side of our rides and drives. Not only do they create an excellent habitat for insects and invertebrates but they’re also an attractive addition to our woodland.

White tailed bumble bee on a Habitat Pile

The cracks and crevices in the logs make excellent winter hibernation sites for peacock butterflies and buff tailed bumble bee queens amongst many other bee, butterfly, moth and beetle varieties. Invertebrates like bumble bees and various solitary bees use the holes in the log pile for nesting. In particular, the leaf cutter bees use the smaller holes and bumble bees will use the larger.

Different hard and soft woods in a Habitat Pile

Small mammals will also benefit from the log piles. They provide shelter as well as nesting places for voles, mice and shrews. In turn, this provides feeding opportunities for tawny owls, buzzards, kestrels, stoats, weasels and other predators. Small insect eating birds and bats will also benefit from the population of moths and larval crawling insects that live in and around the piles.

The wood piles are made up of different hard and soft woods that will rot and decay at varying rates. Therefore, increasing the amount of invertebrates that will use it for hibernating and feeding at different points in their life cycle.

Habitat piles are an important environment, they create a safe haven for many species that are in decline, while provide a stunning display of nature on our estate.

 

 

The Belmont Estate
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